As social media marketers, we have a lot competing for our attention. Whether it’s monitoring trending topics, sharing relevant content, or networking with other marketers, we rely on systems to help us stay organized. The problem with finding a system that works for you, and then never changing your workflow, is that you might be missing out on some really neat features on your favorite social networks.

But let’s be honest – it’s pretty much impossible to know that you don’t know something that you don’t know. That’s why we’ve collected a list of our favorite little-known, hidden, or long-forgotten features on Facebook and Twitter:

1. Facebook: Save Link
This one comes first because you don’t have time not to know about it. The ability to save Facebook articles was pretty well publicized (including on our blog), but a lot of people forget about it because it’s buried in a menu. I don’t know about you, but nothing frustrates me more than seeing an article on Facebook, trying to find it later, and never seeing it again…because algorithms. Here’s how you can combat this:

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2. Twitter: Save by Favoriting
There are ways to curate tweets into reading lists using custom timelines and other more official means, but my favorite way to save things I see on Twitter for later consumption is just to give ‘em a favorite. It’s just one tap, it builds relationships with other users, and it enhances your own profile. All of the tweets you’ve favorited are collected on your Twitter profile page, just under your cover image, where you (and anyone else) can browse through them when you have time.

3. Facebook: Edit Photos on Mobile
This is one of those things that if you never read about, or accidentally did it by mistake, you might never know about it. Say you are live-posting for your business about an event you’re attending, and you want to share some photos. You don’t have time to open them up in your favorite editing app, save them, and then share them. But, you still want them (and you!) to look as good as possible. Just tap to share a photo on Facebook, select the image you want from your camera roll, and then tap that image within the status draft you’ve created on Facebook. This will bring up a full editing interface where you can add filters, do quick adjustments, tag people, and crop, right there in Facebook.

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4. Twitter: Find Out Who Unfollowed You
Creepy? Maybe. Useful? Definitely. If you tweet for your business, you probably already use Twitter Analytics to optimize your strategy based on the engagement of the people who follow you. But what about the people you unfollow you? By finding out who chooses not to hear from you anymore (with a tool like who.unfollowed.me), you can determine if your current strategy is alienating the people you want to reach, and adjust accordingly.

5. Facebook: Follow Without Friending
Before you get too excited, be aware that not everyone will have this feature enabled on their profile. That said, if they do, it’s pretty darn useful. Is there a public figure you’d like to hear from in your news feed, but don’t want to send a friend request to? You can! For example, we had the chance to interact with Forbes Top 10 Social Media Influencer Kim Garst (hi Kim!) during the recent Social Media Marketing World conference. And while it was great to tweet with her, I wouldn’t feel comfortable sending her a friend request on Facebook (because I’m a stranger, and that’s creepy). However, Kim has her profile set up such that people can follow her public posts without friending her first. If you’d like to enable this for yourself, learn how here.

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6. Twitter: Mute Feature
We discussed this when it first came out, but Twitter’s mute feature bears revisiting. If you have someone in your Twitter feed who you want to remain engaged with, but find their content irrelevant or irritating, Twitter mute is for you. Or, in a less extreme example, maybe someone you know is attending an event and is kind enough to issue a volume alert letting followers know that they’ll be posting a lot on a certain topic for the next few days. If that topic doesn’t interest you, you can mute them while the event is going on, and then unmute them when their feed goes back to normal.

7. Facebook: Interests Lists
If you use Facebook for both business and pleasure, this will be of particular interest. Sometimes when you’re browsing your news feed for great content to share or learn from, it’s easy to lose an hour due to all the other unrelated items you encounter. Combat this with Facebook’s Interests Lists. From your Home screen on Facebook, scroll down the left-hand navigation until you see the header INTERESTS. Click that, and you’ll be taken to a page where you can create new lists that will serve as custom-curated news feeds for your browsing pleasure.

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8. Facebook: English (Pirate)
In honor of #TBT today, we’re taking it back to 2008 when people first began to discover that they could set their language on Facebook to English (Pirate). This probably falls under the category of ‘long forgotten’ because it has no practical application. But if you want to have a laugh today and experience a blast from the past, click the dropdown menu in the top right corner of your Facebook window, click Settings, and edit your language setting to English (Pirate). When you get sick of this (and you will), just repeat the process to change back to your original language. Important note: when you return to the dropdown menu, Settings will now be called Adjust ye riggin’s.

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We hope you find these tips and tricks for Facebook and Twitter helpful and/or entertaining. If you have any favorite hidden features for other social networks, please share them in the comments!

About the Author: Sarah Matista is the Content Marketing Manager at Webs, where she also manages marketing for Pagemodo – a suite of social media tools. Loves social media, branding, whales. Get more from Sarah on Pagemodo’s Blog and Google+.

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