Of all the spaces a brand can occupy on the Internet – between websites, local listings, and social profiles – your Twitter header is certainly one of the biggest canvases you have to work with. So why not take that giant billboard and make it look its very best?

Since it first launched, users have created over a million of Facebook cover photos using Pagemodo Cover Photo Designer – and we’re excited to announce that we’re taking our talents to Twitter! With our new Twitter Header Designer, you can use the same tools, images, backgrounds, fonts, and icons to create a consistent brand across both of your favorite social profiles.

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So, now that you have the tools, what should you build? To answer that question, let’s take some notes from what highly successful brands are doing with their Twitter header photos today, and think about how they can be applied to your own brand.

1. Go minimal
If you already have a recognizable brand image, a really minimal header image can be a great way to make your profile stand out, like The New York Times.

NYT

2. Make a statement
If your brand is known for having strong opinions or association with a certain cause, you can use your Twitter header image to draw attention in a big way, like Airbnb recently did for their #Mankind/Womankind/Transkind campaign.

Airbnb

3. Plug a promotion
If you have a campaign running on your website, in-store, or on social media, don’t waste any opportunity to plug it – especially not when you have so much space to work with! See how Vistaprint used their header photo to promote their Magnify Micro Business movement.

Vistaprint

4. Show off all your things
If you produce a variety of products, why not give your Twitter visitors a sense of the range that you offer with your Twitter header image? Use a collage template to show various items, or lay it all out and take a single photo like Fossil.

Fossil

5. Show off one of your things
Alternatively, if your brand produces a variety of things but is really known for just one, consider featuring a standout image that makes that single item the hero of the header, like the Detroit brand, Shinola.

Shinola

6. Make it personal
Taking a learning from Facebook research, think about including people and faces in your Twitter header image. Studies have shown that people on the social network are drawn to pictures of people, so why not show how your brand can affect real people’s lives, like Nest does.

nest

7. Create a collage
Similar to the approach above, consider creating a collage that combines products with the people who enjoy them in settings that reflect your brand and your offerings, the way Walmart has.

walmart

8. Stand out with complementary colors
If you really want to make your profile pop, combine complementary colors that play well off each other – bonus points if one of those colors is intrinsic to your brand, like Harry’s orange.

Harrys

9. Combine boldness with subtlety
Another way to make your logo stand out is to create a Twitter header photo that acts as a backdrop, supporting your brand without competing with your logo, like DC-area brewer Atlas Brew Works.

atlas

10. Harp on your hashtag
I couldn’t get through a whole blog post on making your brand stand out without mentioning one of my favorite service apps, Eat24. Their Twitter header image truly reflects their bold, irreverent brand while also promoting one of their hashtags, which also reminds us of their brand promise: Eat24 helps you put food on the table without having to put on pants.

Eat24

Hopefully these Twitter header image tips have inspired you to make the most of your Twitter profile art, and maybe even to try out Pagemodo’s new Twitter Header Designer. Show off your creations by linking to your Twitter profile in the comments below!

About the Author: Sarah Matista is the Content Marketing Manager at Webs, where she also manages marketing for Pagemodo – a suite of social media tools. Loves social media, branding, whales. Get more from Sarah on Pagemodo’s Blog and Google+.

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